COLLECTIVE INSECURITIES: Anti-social Applications

Intelligent Discourse in The Age of “Information”

or  It Was Like That When I Found It


As a member of generation Y, the last to grow up in a world not predominately obsessed with numbers of followers, ironic bandwagoning and ghostly pictures of Applebees entrees with just the right filter, but still able to identify with the digital world, I find myself having a hard time navigating social media, habitually alternating between bursts of brilliant free association as I enchant comment readers into veritable states of euphoric ecstasy ebbing and flowing with wondrous witticisms, and falling into fits of rage akin to Christian Bale demoralizing an intern as he portrays Yosemite Sam at the Battle of the Bugs U.S.S.Hare, or at the very least moments of anger that make me ashamed to be literate.  Although that is not any sort of pre-requisite on any “social media” outlets I frequent, but I digress.


“How you digressin’?”

I find myself desiring more of a contemporary in my, contemporaries.  A companion of my opinions.  The company of contemplating curiousos with ideas I could opine as my own.  A cornucopia of comrades?  A curtain call to the crime of constant alliteration?  But maybe my follies have a tendency to run away with not only cheap literary devices but with my own supposed solution? Not that I have any clue as to what that means, but I assure you with one swipe of the Instweetychatter and some 12 year old guru will explain it and have you calling Grandma on AOL Email in no time.

Human desire tends to be insatiable.  We become so anxious for pleasure that we can never get enough of it.  As a result, we overstimulate or sensory organs until they become desensitized, so if the pleasure is to continue, we must have stronger and stronger stimulants.[1] Our bodies become weak from the constant strain, yet never satisfied the brain continues beeping and booping.  This brain, in it’s pursuit of happiness, and generally being much more concerned about the future as opposed to the present, conceives happiness as a guarantee of an indefinitely long “future of pleasures”.  However human consciousness is aware of the bodies finite nature, so in order to be in a state of “happy”, it must cram eternal paradise into the span of years, months, even news cycles.  This indiscriminate thirst for simple stimulation, as opposed to enjoying something of substance, has lead the wagon towards a need for the new, to be first, to be different, to be the same but on your letterhead on your page,  all to the detriment of content and quality.   As is evidenced in this post, I square dance that line consistently, wanting to entertain myself, but not wanting to demoralize or devalue the youth, yet feeling as if the insights I’ve gained through the trials and tribulations of those before me, the benefits and pitfalls of my personal history, the damned proper use of the Oxford Comma in 2017, and, I have no idea,.

joey 2.jpeg

“Comma on!”

This is why modern civilization is in almost every respect a vicious cylce.  It’s insatiable hunger is caused because it’s way of life condemns it to perpetual frustration. The root of this frustration is that we live for the future, but the future is an abstraction, a rational inference based on experience that only exists for the brain.  In reality tomorrow never comes, by then it’s today.  The future cannot become a part of experienced reality until it is present.  We are aware of the abstract nature of the future-it cannot be eaten, smelled, felt, seen, heard, or otherwise enjoyed biologically. Therefore to pursue the future is to pursue a constantly disappearing phantom, and the faster you chase, the quicker it becomes. [2]

Thus this “brainy” economy designed to instill happiness is a fantastic viscous circle which must either manufacture more and more pleasures or collapse-providing a constant titillation of the ears, eyes, and nerve ends with incessant streams of almost inescapable noise and visual distractions.

– ALAN WATTS, The Wisdom of Insecurity

For once I can rest knowing someone else put it best. Or at least first.


“I get it. Reference humor.”


[1][2] excerpts from Alan Watts’ essay The Wisdom of the Human Body

Photos used off Pinterest.



4 Comments Add yours

  1. clusterfoon says:

    Technology and the virtual senses created by it, is working its way into our evolution. People are losing their awe of the world around them because it’s not stimulating enough to provoke any feeling in them. If there is a god, I wouldn’t blame him/her/it for sending a meteor our way. No one wants their hard work to be take for granted.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Dr. Klopek says:

      especially god/he/she/iiiiiit


    2. Paradoxter says:

      Very astute observation as well.


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